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New DOJ Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit Created
New DOJ Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit Created

Throughout the year, the Office of Inspector General (OIG), as well as the Department of Justice (DOJ) and President Trump, have made it clear that opioid abuse is a primary area of focus for government agencies. In a recent announcement, Attorney General Sessions showed that the government isn’t just talking- they are taking action. On August 2nd, Attorney General Sessions announced the formation of the Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit. This new unit of the DOJ will be a pilot program to utilize data to help combat the opioid crisis.

Lessons Learned from 2017 OIG Semiannual Report to Congress
Lessons Learned from 2017 OIG Semiannual Report to Congress

Each year, the Department of Health and Human Services and OIG is tasked with updating Congress on its performance, trends, and actions taken to combat healthcare fraud and abuse.  The mid-term report was issued for the period of October 2016 to March 2017 and describes OIG’s work on identifying significant problems, abuses, deficiencies, remedies, and investigative outcomes relating to the administration of HHS programs and operations that were disclosed during the reporting period.

Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) Reporting Accuracy: Then and Now
Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) Reporting Accuracy: Then and Now

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) is not the only source for exclusions. Did you know that the state Medicaid agency and/or State Attorney General, if applicable, in each state must report its actions to the Federal OIG promptly after the agency takes a final action? (Social Security Act 1902(a)(41) and 42 CFR 1002.3(b)(3). In this article, we'll take a look at how well reporting has taken place given the latest OIG research data, and compare Q1 2017 results from our latest CHIRP report.

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